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Are You Secure While Watching Smart T.V?

Are You Secure While Watching Smart T.V?

Category : Uncategorized

 

 

Are You Secure While Watching Smart  T.V

You might enjoy watching your smart TV, but what if your smart TV is watching you back? And it’s not just about tracking what you watch. Your TV might actually be listening to your conversations. Or maybe even watching you through its camera. That’s scary!

 

The TV manufacturer might be getting your information and using it for targeted advertising. But that’s not all. Research has found out that smart TVs can be hacked, thanks to their security flaws. So if someone needs to gain access to your personal life, all they have to do is hack your smart TV and learn all about you.

 

Even if you turn off the mic or camera of the smart TV, there are security vulnerabilities that can let hackers spy on you. To make sure this doesn’t happen, follow these tips. If you already have a smart TV, just stop its supply of connectivity. It won’t be able to send your data to its manufacturers, ad companies, or hackers if you just disconnect it from the internet. Because honestly, you rarely use the voice commands. Sure, when the TV is new, everyone wants to use voice commands. But over the time, you just switch back to remotes since the TV doesn’t interpret voice commands correctly anyway. So to disconnect the TV, just visit the settings and turn off its Wi-Fi capabilities. But you do need Netflix on your TV, right? No problem at all. Just get a streaming box. Google Chromecast will play Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and several other channels.

smart tv hacked

But smart TV spying has gotten much more sophisticated. The latest scandal involves a company called Samba TV, an app included in smart TVs made by Sony, TCL, Philips, and other major manufacturers. Samba is a seemingly harmless app that offers recommendations on what to watch, and that sounds awfully handy in a world where we may spend hours scrolling through Netflix to pick a show. It’s handy enough that most people (around 90%) just click “accept” when their new TV asks if they want to enable Samba.

The trouble is that by clicking accept you’re giving Samba access to a lot more than your viewing information. Samba also checks out devices connected to the same Wi-Fi network as your television, tracking not only what you’re watching on TV, but when you watch, where you go, and what you’re doing in other apps — which it can share with others for marketing purposes.

Even if you turn off the mic or camera of the smart TV, there are security vulnerabilities that can let hackers spy on you. To make sure this doesn’t happen, follow these tips. If you already have a smart TV, just stop its supply of connectivity. It won’t be able to send your data to its manufacturers, ad companies, or hackers if you just disconnect it from the internet. Because honestly, you rarely use the voice commands. Sure, when the TV is new, everyone wants to use voice commands. But over the time, you just switch back to remotes since the TV doesn’t interpret voice commands correctly anyway. So to disconnect the TV, just visit the settings and turn off its Wi-Fi capabilities. But you do need Netflix on your TV, right? No problem at all. Just get a streaming box. Google Chromecast will play Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and several other channels.

I want to bring in the context the recent incident occurred in the Surat about a couple which has lead to crime smart tv made that couple private videos.

Rajesh Kumar* was in the habit of watching porn on his smart TV in his bedroom and often visited adult websites. Recently, the married man got the shock of his life when he discovered a video of intimate moments he had shared with his wife, on one such website. The cybersecurity experts that Rajesh* contacted eventually found out that the smart TV in his room had been hacked into and that its camera functionality was remotely used to capture footage – all without Rajesh’s* knowledge.

Rajesh*, a resident of a posh locality in Surat, was both stunned and extremely disturbed when he had discovered the video of him and his wife on a porn site. While he did not contact cops owing to fear of public humiliation, he got in touch with certain cybersecurity experts with knowledge of crimes using high-end technology. These experts reportedly investigated Rajesh’s* room where the video was shot but did not find any hidden camera anywhere. For a considerable period of time, even the experts were apparently flummoxed by how the video could have been recorded and then uploaded online. Then, eyes fell on the smart TV in the room.

Subsequent investigations revealed that because Rajesh* used to visit porn sites, a hacker on one such site could have easily broken into the TV – just like computers are hacked into – and used the in-built camera remotely to capture the live feed. Because the TV was WiFi-enabled, the recorded video was also uploaded online – all without the knowledge of Rajesh* and his wife. –about this incident let us see what

 

 

Pritam Mukherjee (ICSS Senior IT Security Analysis)-  icss it security analysis

Actually there are two processes through which this device could be hacked that are as followed:

1. When there is a device connected with the internet and that device is having the loophole (vulnerabilities access) then that device can easily be hacked.

  1. In smart tv, there could be browser and email sender both so if someone browses any the malicious website then the file is download from the website and it can access to the system and can also send email in the malicious file then it could be hacked easily.

                                  So looking to these points we can say that the incident took place in Surat was really hacked through smart tv


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