Monthly Archives: February 2018

Cybersecurity Threats

Cybersecurity Threats not to be ignored by SMB Etailers

Category : Blog

Cybersecurity Threats not to be ignored by SMB Etailers. Some small e-commerce website operators may think their relative obscurity offers protection, but the fact is that SMBs are especially vulnerable to cyberattacks and malware.

Cybersecurity Threats

“Very often small businesses don’t feel vulnerable to cybersecurity threats because they assume cybercriminals prefer to launch attacks on large companies,” said Stephanie Weagle, VP of Corero.

“On the contrary, cybercriminals have greater success in targeting small businesses,” she told the E-Commerce Times.

The most obvious attacks involve the use of overt malware, such as ransomware, or redirection to potentially competitive websites, noted Chris Olson, CEO of The Media Trust.

Other attacks “may insert embarrassing language on the homepage or stealthily execute unwanted programs such as cryptominers, toolbars and fake surveys,” he told the E-commerce Times.

There are three major cybersecurity threats SMB etailers can address effectively.

  1. Unvetted Open Source Code

SMBs that use open source software to keep down costs may increase their vulnerability to cyberattack, Olson suggested.

“There is no accountability for the developer community should a feature or plug-in be compromised,” he said.

“Thousands of retailers use open source platforms and tools to successfully launch their Web-based commerce operations,” Olson noted.

“These open source tools are compromised on a regular basis via extension corruptions or the creation of flawed versions,” he explained, “and as traffic and revenues grow, so does the attraction for criminals.”

Etailers should avoid using open source code that has not been thoroughly vetted, Olson recommended. “For a modest investment, etailers can identify all executing code, analyze its relevance to website functionality, and remediate anomalous activity that could propagate an attack.”

  1. Risky Third-Party Web Components

Third-party Web components “are a significant problem for small businesses,” said Sam Curcuruto, technology evangelist at RiskIQ.

Their users employ “a lot of plugins and open source code which can be exploited downstream to give hackers access to any Web properties running them,” he told the E-Commerce Times.

Among such exploits are keylogger software, which steals credit card data when customers make purchases online.

The Magecart malware package, for example, injects JavaScript code into e-commerce sites running unpatched or outdated versions of shopping cart software from Magento, Powerfront and OpenCart.

Etailers can combat threats posed by third-party Web components by selecting a reputable website hosting provider or Web development company, and “making sure your contracts or agreements with them include routine and periodic security reviews,” Curcuruto said.

They also should include a patching service level agreement, or SLA, “that notes how quickly updates will be applied to their servers and machines that might run your website or payment processing,” he continued.

That would not only address security concerns, but also ensure compliance with regulations such as PCI-DSS, Curcuruto pointed out.

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Cyber Security

Cyber Security in the digital dark age

Category : Blog

Cyber Security in the digital dark age

Cyber Security in the digital dark age. Business leaders who recently convened in Davos for the annual World Economic Forum fretted over the various catastrophes that could hit the globe hard and – given the recent spate of cyber attacks – cyber security was high up on the agenda.

Cyber Security

The end result was the launch of a Global Center for Cyber security (GCC) with a clear mission to “prevent a digital dark age”. It claims to be the first platform for cyber security coordination on a global scale, bringing together governments, business and law enforcement agencies. The importance of cyber security is growing not only for traditional computer networks but also for “artificial intelligence, robotics, drones, self-driving cars and the Internet of Things”.

Cyber attacks are like any other crime, except that the origins and reach can be global. Put simply, a cyber-criminal in one country can reach out to target victims at the other end of the world. Likewise, a gang of cyber criminals could organised themselves across several countries to target their victims.

It’s the unfortunate reality of the connected world we live in, where the internet doesn’t only provide connectivity but also anonymity and transient access, all of which serve to enable such attacks.

On top of that, parallel structures over the internet – known as the dark web – have emerged to facilitate cyber-attacks of all kinds, allowing a black economy to thrive and be marketed.

This year’s Global Risk Report places cyber attacks in the top five global risks, behind only extreme weather events and natural disasters. The World Economic Forum said:

Most attacks on critical and strategic systems have not succeeded – but the combination of isolated successes with a growing list of attempted attacks suggests that risks are increasing. And the world’s increasing interconnectedness and pace heightens our vulnerability to attacks that cause not only isolated and temporary disruptions, but radical and irreversible systemic shocks.

It’s clear that a globally coordinated approach to cyber security is essential.

While this is laudable, there have been similar efforts over the past decade or so – with mixed results. The Budapest Convention on Cyber crime, launched in 2001 by the Council of Europe, was one such attempt to align laws and to enable a key provision of securing digital evidence across jurisdictions to effectively resolve investigations. Harmonization, however, has been a challenge with competing regional efforts emerging in various parts of the world.

NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence based in Tallinn, Estonia, is another such effort. It has played a major role in help producing the Tallinn Manual, which is the most comprehensive of international treaties for cyberspace law. Its impact is severely limited, however, because it is strictly an academic study and legally non-binding.

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Cyber Attacks

Cyber Attacks and Asia’s geopolitical events could have a link?

Category : Blog

Cyber Attacks and geopolitical events in Asia may go hand in hand, according to Comodo’s first annual Global Malware Report for 2017, particularly when it comes to North Korea and China.

Cyber Attacks

Cyberespionage and cyber war preparation in Asia is nothing new, so it is no surprise that the region experiences significant Cyber Attacks spikes when significant events happen, the company surmises in the report.

The report shows that malware spikes occurred at the same time as geopolitical events last year – most notably on September 3 when North Korea conducted a nuclear test. China, Russia and the United States condemned the attacks, and at the same time Comodo detected more than 50,000 Trojan detection’s in China.

In early to mid-May, amid North Korea/China tensions, a meeting with Jared Kushner and China, and the Silk Road Summit in Beijing, cyber attacks reached more than 30,000.

Later in the year, Comodo saw even more Trojan spikes—totalling 40,000 after an Aug. 8 earthquake that killed 19 and a U.S./China naval spat on Aug. 8 in the South China Sea.

This is not the only example. On August 28 2017, North Korea fired missiles over Japan. The same week, there were almost 25,000 detections in Japan. Trojan activity dropped soon after.

“Nuclear activity of any type draws worldwide attention, as nations scramble to gather intelligence and prepare for possible military operations. The startling spike seen above demanded the creation of the more detailed chart below — especially since Comodo is likely one of the few commercial cybersecurity companies with visibility inside North Korea,” the report explains.

Worm detections in the Philippines also spiked in April when there was dispute about the South China Sea, and in May after conflict with ISIS in Mindanao.

Globally, Trojans and malicious applications caused the majority of malware damage to systems.

“Trojans dominated the malware landscape with 41.0% of Comodo detections. Applications exhibiting malicious, unsafe, or undesirable behavior came in second place at 24.7%. And backdoors were the third-most detected form of malware at 10.1%.”

Trojans can be delivered through a range of methods, including phishing emails to malicious advertising.

While Russia was the most popular country for Trojan detections (9.7%), China ranked sixth. The United States ranked top for malicious applications (2.7%), while India featured seventh in the list.

“Looking toward 2018, our malware trend-lines show that the detection rate for Trojans, worms, unsafe applications, and malware packers is currently down. Holding steady are applications, unwanted applications, and viruses. Most importantly for Q1 2018, backdoor are now on the rise, which means that for the moment, enterprises should shift some of their focus to the detection and mitigation of backdoor,” the report concludes.

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Hacking Websites

Hacking websites? Here are the six most popular ways.

Category : Blog

Hacking websites? Here are the six most popular ways. Hackers can hack a website or system or network, which would ultimately lead to the data theft, shutting down of the website, businesses experiencing big losses and so many other serious issues arising due to Hacking websites. Hackers can carry out their attacks in numerous ways to hack all sorts of websites, which is why we need to use all sorts of security systems in order to secure our websites .

Hacking Websites

Have a look at those six popular ways of hacking websites:

The DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) Attack

By far this one is the most favourite practices that is popularly used by hackers. This one is all about denying services which means that a server’s or machine’s amenities are made inaccessible to its operators. Once the system is offline, hackers would compromise the entire website or specific functions of the website and take advantage of the same.

Hackers mostly carry out DDoS attacks by sending tons of URL requests to a website or webpage, all in a small span of time. Thus, there happens a bottlenecking for the server and the CPU would run out of resources.

The RCE (Remote Code Execution) Attack

Hackers exploit vulnerabilities to carry out attacks and execute malicious code remotely to take complete control of an affected system or website. Hackers could target vulnerable components of a website, including libraries, remote directories on a server which aren’t being monitored, frameworks, software modules etc and attack through scripts, malware, small command lines that extract information etc.

The Injection Attack

Injections attacks happen when hackers exploit security flaws that exist in the SQL Database, SQL libraries, or even the operating system itself. Users may unknowingly open files that seem to be credible and which would contain hidden commands (or “injections”) and thereby allow hackers gain unauthorized access to private data- credit card data, social security numbers, other financial data etc.

The XSS (Cross Site Scripting) Attack

A hacker sends an application, URL “get request” or file packet to the web browser window bypassing the validation processes and thereby triggers an XXS script, which makes the website users believe that the webpage which they are viewing is legitimate even though in reality it’s compromised. Thus, they would be made to enter personal details- credit card info or other sensitive personal info, which the hacker would steal and misuse.

DNS Cache Poisoning
Also known as DNS spoofing, DNS Cache Poisoning happens when attackers identify vulnerabilities in a DNS (Domain Name System) and exploit the same to divert traffic from the legit servers to a fake website and/or server. This kind of an attack involves old cache data which is “toxic” and which you think doesn’t exist any longer on your system. Such attacks can also spread and replicate themselves from DNS to DNS, thereby “poisoning” everything that comes in its path.

The Social Engineering Attack

Social engineering attacks are very common these days; using different methods hackers would trick users into divulging confidential information and then they would use the same to attack a website (or organization) or to cause harm to the person himself. The hacker could make use of common online interactions- emails, chats, calls, social media site interactions etc- to carry out such attacks.

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Zero Net

What is Zero Net and why one should use it?

Category : Blog

What is Zero Net?

Zero Net is a network of peer-to-peer users. It is based on the idea of Decentralized Computing. In the modern times, our desktop PCs and other computers have become so advanced that their full potential far exceeds than what is needed. As a matter of case, it remains ‘idle’ most of the time. A decentralized system uses the potential of all these systems to increase efficiency.

Zero Net

What is Peer-to-Peer Web Hosting?

Peer-to-Peer web hosting is a model where peer-to-peer networking is used to host web pages. Unlike the usual client-server model of Web Hosting, where data is transferred between a client and a server, peer-to-peer networking uses peers or other similar users to deliver web content. In case of a P2P model, web content can be delivered by mainly delivered web caches and content delivery networks. The web caches store the content from single web pages and distribute them to other users during peak traffic.

Advantages of using Peer-to-Peer web hosting.

P2P web hosting takes comparatively less time to set up. The cost of setting a p2p connection is comparatively less than a client-server model because in a p2p connection, there is no need of a main central server. Each computer on each node act as a server and a receiver at the same time.

Disadvantages of using a P2P network.

The security vulnerabilities of a p2p network is more than that of a client-server connection. In a p2p network, a computer can be accessed anytime and all the time. In case of security events, patches will have to be applied to each computer separately. Due to lack of a centralized server, data will be unrestricted and uncontrolled. Since there is no central moderator, there backup, restore and availability of files will be unrestricted.

Why use Zero Net?

Zero Net uses the P2P networking model to share and render files and webpages. Since it does not have a centralized server, content from your computer is transferred to another user directly. The P2P concept of network sharing, allows Zero Net to be uncensored, like the website says, ‘It’s nowhere because it’s everywhere’. When we access a website on the Zero Net, we are simultaneously hosting it too. That removes the need of a central server, and thus removes the cost of hosting. The websites are always accessible since it isn’t served by a central server. Also, Zero Net uses bitcoin cryptography to store passwords.

The Zero Net is built in Python and is fully open source. Instead of IP Addresses sites are identified by a public key, the private key allows the user to sign and modify and make changes which spreads through the network.

Final Note:

Although Zero Net provides us the advantages of a decentralized network, it also has its disadvantages too. If one computer is the network isn’t fully patched and updated, it can lead to compromise of security. In a client-server model, although the server is able to monitor and manage content availability, it makes the content more stable. In a P2P network, it is required for at least one computer to be seeding the content for the content to be available. This leads to unreliability.

The concept of a decentralized internet is great when for a small group of people. In such a case, each user is responsible for the security and web content availability. Although Zero Net provides us with the option of an anonymous internet where web content won’t be moderated by a central server, but at the same time it is prone to illegal content, and restricted content being spread and also increases chances of security attacks.

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Cybersecurity Audits

Cybersecurity Audits of companies? Here is what you need to know

Category : Blog

Cybersecurity Audits? Well! unfortunately, most companies believe that their computer systems are secure. But one of the only ways to determine whether this is actually true is by performing a thorough audit of computer systems. Here is why your company should make a point of auditing its security on a regular basis, not only this but also check out some of the particular challenges you may encounter.

Cybersecurity Audits

In less than a decade, Internet security has evolved from an almost obscure topic to become one of the more important facets of modern computing. And yet it’s a rarity to find companies that actually consider information security to be an important job function for all workers—and not just the IT department’s problem.

Unfortunately, it’s the general opinion of most companies, particularly at the management level, that their computer systems are secure. However, one of the only ways to determine whether this is actually true is by performing a thorough audit of computer systems. But most companies don’t make it a habit of performing regular Cybersecurity Audits if they perform them at all.

In my experience, many companies base their Internet and information security strategy entirely on assumptions. And we’re all familiar with that old saying about making assumptions.

But I don’t entirely blame companies for failing to conduct periodic cybersecurity audits. Frankly, the complexity and variability of administering and interpreting a comprehensive computer systems audit are equal to the complexity and variability of the systems used in corporations.

Several dozen popular commercial network and computer security auditing programs are currently available. While I’ve used several myself, I’ve honestly found no favorites. These tools produce mountains of useful information, but understanding what to do with the data is no simple job.

Most computer network and system security audits begin the same way. An automated program gathers information about hosts on the corporate network, identifying the type of network device. If applicable, it also scans the TCP and UDP services that are present and “listening” on the host, and it might even determine the versions of the software supplying an Internet service.

In most cases, the process involves at least two automated scans—one of internal networks, which are generally behind a firewall, and one of the Internet subnet used by the corporation. If a security audit doesn’t include both an interior and exterior scan, then you’re not getting a complete picture of what hosts are on your organization’s network.

In addition, I also recommend that companies perform their own auditing whenever possible. If not, it’s vital that you select an Internet security vendor you don’t currently do business with.

Security audits produce a huge amount of data, and you need to be prepared to review this information in order to truly benefit from the audit. It’s also important to understand that a computer security audit may report potential problems where no real issue exists.

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