Monthly Archives: December 2017

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Password Managers exploited

Password Managers can be exploited using Web Trackers

Category : Blog

Password Managers exploited using web trackers. This type of abusive conduct is possible because of a configuration flaw in the login handlers included with all browsers, login managers that allow browsers to memorize a user’s username and password for particular sites and auto-insert it in login fields when the user revisits that site again.

Password Managers exploited

Experts say that web trackers can install hidden login forms on sites anywhere the tracking scripts are loaded. Because of the way the login handler’s work, the browser will fill these fields with the user’s login information, such as username and passwords.

Password Managers exploited using web trackers. The trick is an old one, identified for more than a decade, but until now it’s only been employed by hackers trying to collect login data during XSS (cross-site scripting) attacks.

Princeton researchers say they later found two web tracking settings that utilize hidden login forms to get login information.

Fortunately, none of the two services received password information, but only the user’s username or email address depending on what each area uses for the login process.

The two services are Adthink and On Audience, and Princeton researchers said they recognized scripts from these two that collected login info on 1,110 sites found on the Alexa Top 1 Million sites list.

In this particular case, the two corporations were extracting the username/email from the login field, creating a hash, and tieing that hash with the site visitor’s existing advocacy profile.

Email addresses are unique and persistent, and thus the hash of an email address is an excellent tracking identifier. A user’s email address will essentially never change clearing cookies, using private browsing mode, or switching devices won’t stop tracking. The hash of an email address can be used to attach the pieces of an online profile scattered across different browsers, devices, and mobile apps.

Researchers from the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) also produced a demo page that users can test using false credentials and see if their browser’s login supervisor fills in the hidden field.

 

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Smartphones are hackable

Smartphones are hackable using sensors via guessing 4 digit smartphone PIN

Category : Blog

Smartphones are hackable using sensors via guessing 4 digit smartphone PIN. NTU researchers have revealed that smartphones can now be hacked using the data accumulated from sensors.

Smartphones are hackable

Dr. Shivam, a scientist at NTU, who recently developed an app that can hack data from smartphones using sensors, found this recently and the news has sent shockwaves around the world.

As per a research published in Cryptology ePrint Archive, it is now possible for hackers to unlock smartphones using physical sensors such as an accelerometer, ambient light, and gyroscope.

Smartphones are hackable as these sensors are accessible by all apps that are downloaded on a smartphone and no permission is needed to access them.

What NTU’s developed Software Can Do?

In its test run, the app was successful in unlocking the phone with 99% accuracy and that too in just 3 tries. This app has increased the code crack possibility from 74% to 99%.

This app can guess ten thousand possible pin number combinations based on four digits.

How Can This App Figure A Pin Number?

As stated earlier, this app works on physical sensors and is developed on machine learning code. Therefore, when a user uses fingers or thumbs to enter a code, this app notes two factors regarding how the user did it which includes:

  • How was the phone tilted?
  • How much of light was blocked when a user pressed numbers to enter a code?

Why Should You Worry?

The director of NTU said that since a lot of apps require access to physical sensors, hackers can use it to their advantage and hack your phone to get access to your personal details.

What Should You Do?

Dr. Shivam has recommended all smartphone users to extend their 4 digit codes and also to use other phone locking methods, such as finger locking. This is a must if you do not want someone to hack your phone.

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FBI’s biometric hacked?

FBI’s biometric hacked?

Category : Blog

FBIs biometric hacked. The allegations that Russia hacked the 2016 elections in the United States are known to many but now biometric data of millions of American citizens may or may not be at risk of being compromised as software used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and 18,000 other American law enforcement agencies to store biometric data carries a code developed by a Russian company linked to the Russian government.

FBIs biometric hacked

According to the latest FBIs biometric hacked report by Buzz Feed, a French company called Sagem Sécurité (now known as Morpho) sold biometric software to the FBI but did not inform the agency that the code used in the software was developed by Russian firm Papillon AO.

Buzz Feed published the FBIs biometric hacked report after two French whistle-blowers who worked for Morpho spoke out and emphasized that authorities should be concerned about the presence of Russian code in a software since Papillon has close ties with several Kremlin security and intelligence agencies including KGB’s replacement Federal Security Service (FSB).

The NewYork based Buzz Feed also reviewed a 2008 contact between Papillon and Morpho regarding the purchase of the code which maintains that it does not carry any backdoor “or any “virus, ‘Trojan horse,’ ‘worm,’ or other software routines or hardware components designed to permit unauthorized access, to disable, erase, or otherwise harm the software, hardware, or data.”

Papillon, on the other hand, has also denied the presence of any backdoor in the code. The FBI, however, did not reply to questions asked by BuzzFeed although they did offer a statement in which the agency said: “As is typical for all commercial software that we operate, appropriate security reviews were completed prior to operational deployment.”

In October 2016 report it was revealed that one out of two American adults is part of the FBI’s facial recognition database. Therefore, the use of software provided by a Russian firm with links to the Kremlin should be concerning, cited BuzzFeed.

Recently, the cybersecurity giant and Internet security software provider Kaspersky was slapped with a ban from providing its product to the US military due to its alleged ties with Kremlin and its intelligence agency FSB. The report also claimed that Russia stole NSA hacking tools using Kaspersky software.

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Security vulnerability found

Security vulnerability found in ATM machines running on Windows XP in Russia

Category : Blog

Security vulnerability found in ATM machines running on Windows XP in Russia. All ATMs that are still running on Microsoft’s 16-year-old Windows XP operating system are at the risk of getting hacked easily, as the OS is no longer supported by the Redmond giant except for emergency security patches (for instance, patch blocking the WannaCry ransomware released this year).

Security vulnerability found

An employee of Russian blogging platform Habrahabr recently discovered that the ATMs operated by the state-owned bank Sberbank running Windows XP has inherent security vulnerabilities that can be easily exploited by hackers.

According to the user, a full-screen lock that prevents access to various components of an ATM operating system could be bypassed by turning on the Sticky Keys when special keys like SHIFT, CTRL, ALT, and WINDOWS were pressed 5 times.

By pressing SHIFT key 5 times in a row, it allowed access to Windows settings and displaying the taskbar and Start menu of the operating system giving users to access deep within Windows XP from the touchscreen. This vulnerability allows hackers to deploy malicious software or modify ATM boot scripts.

According to the German website WinFuture, Sberbank had been informed of this vulnerability almost two weeks ago that there was a security breach at its ATM machine. While the bank promised to fix the problem immediately, the user who discovered the flaw claimed that when he visited the terminal again, he discovered that the bug hadn’t been fixed.

Since the security vulnerability found in ATM machines Microsoft has urged banks to update the latest version of Windows for ATMs to avoid scams or attacks.

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Satori IOT Botnet

Satori IoT Botnet Exploits Zero-Day to Zombify Huawei Routers

Category : Blog

Satori IoT Botnet Exploits Zero-Day to Zombify Huawei Routers identified by researchers.

Satori IOT Botnet

The flaw is in Huawei’s router model HG532. It said it is tracking hundreds of thousands of attempts to exploit the vulnerability in the wild.

The Mirai botnet made headlines in October 2016, targeting DNS provider Dyn and the Krebs on Security website with massive DDoS attacks. The original Mirai malware exploited flaws found in the CCTV and DVR hardware that allowed a default Linux telnet credential to be used.

Since the Mirai source code became publicly available, many hackers have modified the code and expanded the number of Internet of Things devices compromised. Most have taken advantage of shoddy protections around connected devices and embedded systems.

In the case of Okiku/Satori IoT Botnet, Check Point researchers suspected an inexperienced hacker that goes by “Nexus Zeta” is behind the attacks.

“The identity of the attacker was initially a mystery, with speculations running from advanced nation-state perpetrators to notorious threat gangs,” researchers said.

Researchers then cross-referenced the email addressed used for the domain registration with an email address used on the popular hacker forum called HackForums.

“Although he is rarely active in such forums, the few posts he does make disclose an amateur actor, though interesting his most recent focus was on an initiative to establish a Mirai-like IoT botnet,” researchers said.

The Okiku/Satori IoT Botnet attacks differ from previous Mirai variants in that they don’t rely on brute-force telnet-based attacks. Instead, the new variant runs attacks over port 37215 exploiting the previously unknown CVE-2017-17215 vulnerability in Huawei HG532 devices.

The attack involves a command injection, where the malicious payload is downloaded and executed on the Huawei router, researchers said.

The flaw is tied to the router’s use of the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) protocol and the TR-064 technical report standard. TR-064 is a standard designed to make it easy to add embedded UPnP devices to a local network.

“In this case though, the TR-064 implementation in the Huawei devices was exposed to WAN through port 37215 (UPnP),” researchers wrote. The UPnP framework supports a “DeviceUpgrade” that can carry out a firmware upgrade action.

The vulnerability allows remote administrators to execute arbitrary commands by injecting shell meta-characters into the DeviceUpgrade process.

“After these have been executed, the exploit returns the default HUAWEIUPNP message, and the ‘upgrade’ is initiated,” researchers wrote.

The payload’s main purpose is to instruct the bot to flood targets with manually crafted UDP or TCP packets.

“The number of packets used for the flooding action and their corresponding parameters are transmitted from the C&C server. Also, the C&C server can pass an individual IP for attack or a subnet using a subnet address and a number of valuable bits,” researchers said.

According to Huawei, mitigation against attack includes configuring the router’s built-in firewall, changing the default password or using a firewall on the carrier side.

Check Point said it’s still unclear how the vulnerability it discovered found its way to Nexus Zeta’s possession.

“As seen in this case as well as others over the past year, it is clear that a combination of leaked malware code together with exploitable and poor IoT security, when used by unskilled hackers, can lead to disastrous results,” Check Point said.

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Cryptocurrency Mining Virus

Cryptocurrency Mining Virus spreading through Facebook Messenger

Category : Blog

Cryptocurrency Mining Virus spreading through Facebook Messenger. These hackers send a video file (packed in zip archive) from anybody’s profile (or your friends) – Do not click on it.

Cryptocurrency Mining Virus

Researchers from security firm Trend Micro are warning users of a new cryptocurrency mining bot which is spreading through Facebook Messenger and targeting Google Chrome desktop users to take advantage of the recent surge in cryptocurrency prices.

Dubbed Digmine, the Monero-cryptocurrency mining bot disguises as a non-embedded video file, under the name video_xxxx.zip (as shown in the screenshot), but is actually contains an Auto-It executable script.

Once clicked, the malware infects victim’s computer and downloads its components and related configuration files from a remote command-and-control (C&C) server.

Digimine primarily installs a cryptocurrency miner, i.e. miner.exe—a modified version of an open-source Monero miner known as XMRig—which silently mines the Monero cryptocurrency in the background for hackers using the CPU power of the infected computers.

Dig-mines attack chain

Besides the cryptocurrency miner, Digimine bot also installs an auto start mechanism and launch Chrome with a malicious extension that allows attackers to access the victims’ Facebook profile and spread the same malware file to their friends’ list via Messenger.

Since Chrome extensions can only be installed via official Chrome Web Store, “the attackers bypassed this by launching Chrome (loaded with the malicious extension) via command line.”
“The extension will read its own configuration from the C&C server. It can instruct the extension to either proceed with logging in to Facebook or open a fake page that will play a video” Trend Micro researchers say.

“The decoy website that plays the video also serves as part of their C&C structure. This site pretends to be a video streaming site but also holds a lot of the configurations for the malware’s components.”

It’s noteworthy that users opening the malicious video file through the Messenger app on their mobile devices are not affected.

Since the miner is controlled from a C&C server, the authors behind Digiminer can upgrade their malware to add different functionalities overnight.

Digmine was first spotted infecting users in South Korea and has since spread its activities to Vietnam, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Philippines, Thailand, and Venezuela. But since Facebook Messenger is used worldwide, there are more chances of the bot being spread globally.

When notified by Researchers, Facebook told it had taken down most of the malware files from the social networking site.

Facebook Spam campaigns are quite common. So users are advised to be vigilant when clicking on links and files provided via the social media site platform.

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Wordpress Captcha plugin

WordPress captcha plugin having a hidden backdoor affects over 300,000 websites

Category : Blog

WordPress captcha plugin having a hidden backdoor affects over 300,000 websites. Obtaining prevalent plugins with an enormous user-base and using it for effortless malicious campaigns have become a new trend for bad players.

Wordpress Captcha pluginRecently a renowned developer BestWebSoft sold a popular WordPress Captcha plugin to an anonymous buyer, who then amended the plugin to download and install a hidden backdoor.

In a recent blog post, WordFence security firm shown why WordPress recently kicked a popular Captcha plugin with more than 300,000 active installations out of its official plugin store.

While reviewing the source code of the Captcha plugin, WordFence folks found a severe backdoor that could allow the plugin author or attackers to remotely gain administrative access to WordPress websites without requiring any authentication.

The plugin was configured to automatically pull an updated “backdoored” version from a remote URL — https[://]simplywordpress[dot]net/captcha/captcha_pro_update.php — after installation from the official WordPress repository without site admin consent.

In WordPress captcha plugin this backdoor code was designed to create a login session for the attacker, who is the plugin author in this case, with administrative privileges, allowing them to gain access to any of the 300,000 websites (using this plugin) remotely without requiring any authentication?

“This backdoor creates a session with user ID 1 (the default admin user that WordPress creates when you first install it), sets authentication cookies, and then deletes itself’” reads the WordFence blog post. “The backdoor installation code is unauthenticated, meaning anyone can trigger it.”

Also, the modified code pulled from the remote server is almost identical to the code in legitimate plugin repository, therefore “triggering the same automatic update process removes all file system traces of the backdoor,” making it look as if it was never there and helping the attacker avoid detection.

The reason behind the adding a backdoor is unclear at this moment, but if someone pays a handsome amount to buy a popular plugin with a large user base, there must be a strong motive behind.

In similar cases, we have seen how organized cyber gangs acquire popular plugins and applications to stealthy infect their large user base with malware, adware, and spyware.

While figuring out the actual identity of the Captcha plugin buyer, WordFence researchers found that the simplywordpress[dot]net domain serving the backdoor file was registered to someone named “Stacy Wellington” using the email address “scwellington[at]hotmail.co.uk.”

Using reverse whois lookup, the researchers found a large number of other domains registered to the same user, including Convert me Popup, Death to Comments, Human Captcha, Smart Recaptcha, and Social Exchange.

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ProtonVPN Android App

ProtonVPN has launched its app!

Category : Blog

ProtonVPN has announced the public release of the ProtonVPN Android app! The app is available as of now in the Play Store. To download it, simply follow this link:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.protonvpn.android

ProtonVPN Android App

They first launched ProtonVPN in June of this year, and have seen an overwhelming response from the community. They are continuously working towards their mission to bring secure Internet anywhere for everyone and adding native support for Android devices marks another major milestone in their journey.

Together with thousands of community members, they have extensively beta-tested the ProtonVPN Android app over the past several months. They have listened to all the feedback and created what we think is the most user-friendly and secure Android VPN app out there.

The new Android app supports all of ProtonVPN’s advanced security features such as Secure Core, TOR over VPN, auto-start on boot, as well as connection profiles to save our favorite VPN servers.

Additionally, the ProtonVPN Android app also features support for the IKEv2 protocol, which provides the highest speeds and stability even in difficult mobile network conditions (e.g. switching between LTE and WiFi, poor reception, or switching between cell towers). This ensures the best level of protection no matter where we go with our devices.

Development for the macOS, iOS, and Linux clients are in full swing and they have started beta testing the macOS app already. Stay tuned for more detailed information in the near future.

As always, you can use any OpenVPN application to connect to ProtonVPN and you can find the tutorials for platforms without a dedicated app here:
macOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup
iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup
Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup

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A new android malware

A new android malware can be a possible threat to your phone.

Category : Blog

A new Android malware has been discovered by a group of researchers, which can possibly physically damage your phone.

A new android malware

Your phone is physically under threat due to this new Android Malware.

Hackers, as well as legitimate website administrators, are progressively using Javascript based cryptocurrency miners to monetize by levying the CPU power of your PC to mine Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, due to the latest surge in cryptocurrency prices.

Just last week, Researchers from AdGuard revealed that some prevalent video streaming and ripper sites including openload, Streamango, Rapidvideo, and OnlineVideoConverter hijacks CPU cycles from their over hundreds of millions of visitors for mining Monero cryptocurrency.

Now, researchers from Moscow-based cyber security firm Kaspersky Lab have disclosed a new Android malware lurking in fake anti-virus and porn applications, which is capable of executing an overabundance of disreputable activities—from excavating cryptocurrencies to hurling Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) bouts.

Described as a “jack-of-all-trades” by the researchers, Loapi has a modular architecture that lets it conduct a variety of malicious activities, including mining the Monero cryptocurrency, launching DDoS attacks, bombarding infected users with constant ads, redirecting web traffic, sending text messages, and downloading and installing other apps.

Loapi Destroyed An Android Phone In Just 2 Days 

hack-android-malware

When analyzed A new Android malware, dubbed Loapi, the new Android Trojan can perform so many more malicious activities at a time that can exploit a handset to the extent that within just two days of infection it can cause the phone’s battery to bulge out of its cover.

According to researchers, the Hackers behind Loapi are the same account for the 2015 Android malware Podec. They are dispensing the malware through third-party app stores and online advertisements that pose as apps for “popular antivirus solutions and even a famous porn site.”

A screenshot in the Kaspersky blog suggests that Loapi impersonates as at least 20 variations of adult-content apps and legitimate antivirus software from AVG, Psafe DFNDR, Kaspersky Lab, Norton, Avira, Dr. Web and CM Security, among others.

Upon installation, Loapi forces the user to grant it ‘device administrator’ permissions by looping a pop-up until a victim clicks yes, which gives the malicious app the same power over your smartphone that you have.

This highest level privilege on a device would also make the Loapi malware ideal for user espionage, though this capability is not yet present in the malware, the Kaspersky researchers think this can be included in the future.

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SSL Certificate

SSL Certificate

Category : Blog

SSL Certificate

SSL Certificate authenticity is being doubted because of the increase in the online hacking of your personal data even from the websites having SSL certificate. Wondering how it’s done? Here we have explained it in a very simplified manner.

SSL Certificate

Did you know how the online passwords are hacked? Well, read on to learn.

In order to understand how the hacking of online passwords work, we need to first understand how safe SSL certificate is really? These days Fund transfers and online shopping are done using predominantly internet banking and credit cards. And people believe that once a website acquires SSL certificate it is entirely safe, but the fact is that it’s always better to secure your computer and internet connection instead of entirely depending on the payment sites because it’s actually quite easy to break the SSL. For this we also should understand how credit cards work and how transactions are performed.

An understanding of how we can exploit the vulnerability in credit or debit card functionality to hack their passwords is also much required, usually credit cards are hacked using packet sniffing and session hijacking. It is virtually impossible to see the actual data that is transferred during a transaction, but by using session hijacking and packet sniffing we can achieve to see the data in an encrypted form.

What really is attacked?

A lethal flaw that allows sensitive information to be stolen occurs when an end-user is not properly educated on the easily executable, well-known SSL exploit: SSL MITM. Hackers take advantage of that to get access to your sensitive data. The only thing required to block the ambiguities in the system is a rightly educated end user to make sure that your system is 100% hacker proof.

How the hack works and how to do it:

Before we get started on this topic it is very important to note that hacking credit & debit card details is unlawful which results in serious consequences including imprisonment. This information is entirely just to make you aware of how it works.

The following diagram demonstrates a very streamlined graphic of how your SSL website session works during an attack:

MITM-attack-diagram

 

A certificate is used to establish the secure SSL connection. It is advisable if you have the right certificate and are connecting directly to the website you intended to use. Then all your data is encrypted from your browser to the SSL website where the bank’s website will use the information from the certificate it gave you to decrypt your data/credentials. If that is truly the case, then it is pretty darn hard for a hacker to decrypt the data/credentials being transmitted, even if he is able to sniff your data.

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